Molly Ringwald won't show her movies to 'woke' daughter

Molly Ringwald has admitted doesn’t want to show her classic ’80s movies to her ‘woke’ younger children, due to some of the films’ ‘complicated’ elements in context of today’s modern world and the #MeToo movement. 

The former teen queen is famous for starring in Sixteen Candles (1984), The Breakfast Club (1985) and Pretty in Pink (1986), but previously noted how issues of racism, sexism, and homophobia within them now makes her feel uncomfortable.

Speaking on this week, Ringwald explained: ‘It definitely is a different time. People ask me if I’ve watched them with my kids, and I did watch the first one — which was the impetus to write that article — with Mathilda.’ (She wrote an essay in 2018 on the subject for .) 

Parental control: Molly Ringwald has said she doesn't want to show her past movies to her children, (Pictured above with her 12-year-old twins Adele and Roman.)

Parental control: Molly Ringwald has said she doesn’t want to show her past movies to her children, (Pictured above with her 12-year-old twins Adele and Roman.) 

‘And it was such an emotional experience that I haven’t found that strength to watch it with my two other kids,’ she said.

Continuing: ‘My 12-year-old daughter Adele is the most woke individual that you’ve ever met, and I just don’t know how I’m gonna go through that, you know, watching it with her and [her] saying, «How could you do that? How could you be part of something that…»‘

Ringwald, 53, has three children with husband Panio Gianopoulos; Mathilda, 17, and 12-year-old twins Adele and Roman. 

Sexism: Molly has previously written about some of the 'troubling' elements of sexism, racism and homophobia in the hit '80s movies she starred in like Pretty in Pink (Pictured above)

Sexism: Molly has previously written about some of the ‘troubling’ elements of sexism, racism and homophobia in the hit ’80s movies she starred in like Pretty in Pink (Pictured above) 

Later she adds: ‘There’s elements to those films that I find homophobic, but on the other hand, they’re also about people that felt like outsiders. They speak to a lot of people. They’re complicated. I feel like that’s what makes the movies really wonderful.’

However, Ringwald adds that she doesn’t want the films to be ‘erased’ due to some of the outdated situations told in the stories. 

‘That doesn’t mean at all that I want them to be erased. I’m proud of those movies, and I have a lot of affection for them. They are so much a part of me,’ she explained.

Iconic: Molly with Ally Sheedy (left) in John Hughes 1985 hit The Breakfast Club

Iconic: Molly with Ally Sheedy (left) in John Hughes 1985 hit The Breakfast Club

'80s teen queen: Molly Ringwald and Michael Schoeffling in the 1984 flick Sixteen Candles

’80s teen queen: Molly Ringwald and Michael Schoeffling in the 1984 flick Sixteen Candles

In her essay for The New Yorker, Ringwald wrote about how the character Bender sexually harasses her character Claire in The Breakfast Club. 

The actress revealed she was forced to take another look at the films following the #MeToo movement, «https://swsu.ru/sbornik-statey/how-to-write-a-thesis.php and all the actresses that were coming forward against Harvey Weinstein. 

She also wrote about how the gay slur ‘f*g’ and ‘f**got’ are ‘tossed around with abandon’ in the film. 

Hands on mom: Molly and her daughter Adele pictured in 2014 at an event in LA

Hands on mom: Molly and her daughter Adele pictured in 2014 at an event in LA

However, Ringwald said she did speak up to director John Hughes about a scene she deemed sexist to get cut from The Breakfast Club.

‘There was a scene in which an attractive female gym teacher swam naked in the school’s swimming pool as Mr. Vernon, the teacher who is in charge of the students’ detention, spied on her,’ she wrote.

‘The scene wasn’t in the first draft I read, and I lobbied John to cut it. He did, and although I’m sure the actress who had been cast in the part still blames me for foiling her break, I think the film is better for it.’ 

Still, Ringwald did also highlight some positives in the movies.

She wrote: ‘That two of Hughes’s films had female protagonists in the lead roles and «https://swsu.ru/sbornik-statey/how-to-write-a-thesis.php examined these young women’s feelings about the fairly ordinary things that were happening to them, while also managing to have instant cred that translated into success at the box office, was an anomaly that has never really been replicated.’

The former teen star concluded her essay by writing that it is ‘up to the following generations to figure out’ how to analyze the movies, and that she hopes they continue to be remembered. 

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